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Sad reason Queensland farmer is selling 7kg melon for $10 revealed

Aisling BrennanNCA NewsWire
Queensland Premier Steven Miles says he’s launching a parliamentary inquiry in supermarket price gouging. NCA NewsWire/Tertius Pickard
Camera IconQueensland Premier Steven Miles says he’s launching a parliamentary inquiry in supermarket price gouging. NCA NewsWire/Tertius Pickard Credit: News Corp Australia

A Queensland farmer struggling to compete with supermarket prices is now selling his watermelons below cost in a bid to make some money.

Premier Steven Miles shared a picture of the watermelon to social media on Friday.

“A Queensland farmer is selling this 7kg watermelon by the side of the road for $10, because he can’t afford to sell it for the $4 he was offered by the supermarkets,” he wrote.

“At the checkout, people are paying close to $20.”

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The post comes as the Queensland Government launched a parliamentary inquiry into supermarket price gouging.

Mr Miles said he’d held meetings with Coles, Woolworths and Aldi on Thursday, where they all agreed to appear before a parliamentary inquiry into the price of groceries.

“They were all concerned about the concerns I was raising with them,” Mr Miles told media on Friday.

“They were good meetings.”

STEVEN MILES
Camera IconQueensland Premier Steven Miles says he’s launching a parliamentary inquiry in supermarket price gouging. NCA NewsWire/Tertius Pickard Credit: News Corp Australia

The terms of reference for the parliamentary inquiry will be finalised ahead of the first sitting week of parliament in February.

“The supermarkets have also agreed to share more information with us and as much of that information that we can share with Queenslanders, we will,” Mr Miles said.

“We’ll put that information together in a way that is transparent for Queenslanders so they can get a better sense of why they’re paying what they’re paying at the supermarket.”

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Camera IconWoolworths will join Coles and Aldi as the supermarkets face the parliamentary inquriy. NCA NewsWire / Roy VanDerVegt Credit: News Corp Australia

Mr Miles said he’d raised concerns with the supermarkets after speaking to farmers struggling to struggling to put food on the table.

“I spoke to them about the experiences of Queensland farmers and the differences in prices between what they’re getting at the farm gate and what Queensland families are paying at the grocery store,” Mr Miles said.

“I look forward to receiving this (information) and we will work with the supermarkets, farmers and growers on solutions that will take pressure off household budgets.”

The move comes after Prime Minister Anthony Albanese put the supermarket giants on notice, warning government intervention could be considered if they do not pass lower prices onto consumers.

Former Labor minister Craig Emerson is leading a review of the national food and grocery code

The code, which the major supermarkets are only required to voluntarily abide by, governs how Coles, Woolworths, Aldi and Metcash (Which owns IGA) interact with suppliers and customers.

Originally published as Sad reason Queensland farmer is selling 7kg melon for $10 revealed

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