$15,000 top price at Pyramid

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Bob GarnantCountryman
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With the $15,000 top-price Pyramid Poll Merino ram, was Pyramid stud principals Scott and Sue Pickering, of Cascade, buyers Cassidy, Brad and Vanessa Whiting, of Munglinup, Nutrien Livestock Esperance auctioneer Neil Brindley, and Nutrien Livestock Esperance manager Darren Chatley.
Camera IconWith the $15,000 top-price Pyramid Poll Merino ram, was Pyramid stud principals Scott and Sue Pickering, of Cascade, buyers Cassidy, Brad and Vanessa Whiting, of Munglinup, Nutrien Livestock Esperance auctioneer Neil Brindley, and Nutrien Livestock Esperance manager Darren Chatley. Credit: Countryman

Cascade-bred Merino and Poll Merino rams reached a top price of $15,000 at the Pickering family's 10th annual on-property sale, with results reflecting an improved season throughout the Esperance region.

The Derella Merino and Pyramid Poll Merino Ram Sale, hosted by Scott and Sue Pickering and conducted by Nutrien Livestock, offered 148 rams, with 132 sold for an average price of $1514, up $199/head on last year when 114 rams sold for an average price of $1315.

Mr Pickering said he was pleased with the sale result.

“We had a good response from repeat buyers and it was great to have a few buyers back to the sale after their absence the last couple of years,” he said.

The star attraction was lot five, which was a replacement, selected from the Pyramid Poll Merino stud reserve that was syndicate mated to Pyramid 564 and a Kamballie 101.

The $15,000 top-priced Pyramid Poll ram carried a well defined crimp on a brilliant white canvas.
Camera IconThe $15,000 top-priced Pyramid Poll ram carried a well defined crimp on a brilliant white canvas. Credit: Bob Garnant/Countryman, Bob Garnant

Repeat buyer Brad Whiting, of Munglinup, said the ram, Pyramid Poll 868, caught his attention before his successful bid of $15,000.

The 20-micron ram weighed 118kg and recorded a staple length of 80mm, greasy fleece weight of 7.2, comfort factor of 99.8 per cent and an eye muscle depth of 39.5.

It also had Australian Sheep Breeding Values of YWT +8.07, YFAT +0.04, YEMD +0.27, YCFW +28.08, YFD +0.04, YSL +10.23 and an MP+ 162.31.

“I selected the ram for his good length and structure of body, with excellent feet and stylish white wool,” Mr Whiting said.

“Merino production requires much less investment than the machinery required for cropping, so we are looking at stepping up our selection of quality in our ram requirements.”

Mr Whiting, his wife Vanessa and their daughter Cassidy run 3200 Merino ewes after culling harder in the last few years with intentions of rebuilding a more even line of quality types.

They secured a total of five rams for an average price of $4880.

With the $8500 second top-price Pyramid Poll Merino ram, was buyers Roger and Joanne Nankivell, of Condingup, Pyramid Poll stud principals Scott and Sue Pickering, of Cascade, Nutrien Livestock Esperance agent Barry Hutcheson and Nutrien Livestock auctioneer Neil Brindley.
Camera IconWith the $8500 second top-price Pyramid Poll Merino ram, was buyers Roger and Joanne Nankivell, of Condingup, Pyramid Poll stud principals Scott and Sue Pickering, of Cascade, Nutrien Livestock Esperance agent Barry Hutcheson and Nutrien Livestock auctioneer Neil Brindley. Credit: Bob Garnant/Countryman, Bob Garnant

Repeat buyer Roger Nankivell, of Condingup, secured the $8500 second top-price for Pyramid Poll 821, sired by Glenlea Park 018.

Mr Nankivell said the ram had good fine crimp, with long stapled fleece on a square and plain body.

“We will put the ram over some of our 120 nucleus ewes to breed flock rams for our 1300-head commercial flock,” he said.

The Pyramid 821 ram measured 19.2 micron and weighed 113kg, with a comfort factor of 99.8 per cent. Its ASBVs were YWT +7.60, YFAT -0.10, YEMD -0.09, YCFW +28.61, YFD -0.39, YSL +14.38, and MP+ 171.36.

Boyup Brook woolgrower Rick Twigg, of Tandara Traders, secured 11 rams to a top price of $2500 and average price of $1738.

Mr Twigg was selecting for quality wool on good frames for his 2500-head Merino ewe flock.

“We first picked our rams on conformation before having a good look at the wool quality,” he said.

Volume buyer Simon Fowler, of Esperance, who trades as Chilwell, secured 29 rams with Nutrien Livestock stud stock agent Mitchell Crosby bidding on his behalf to a top price of $2100 and average price of $1238.

“We were selecting for white, free-growing wool on a good body frame with a good headset and strong muzzle,” he said.

“We’re producing a 21-micron average woolclip from our flock of 26,000 ewes, which includes a crossbred program.

“Our feedlot produces 10-month-old lambs for V & V Walsh.”

First time buyers at the Derella Downs and Pyramid Poll sale were Pete May and Kris George, of Arkle Farms, at Bedford Harbour.
Camera IconFirst time buyers at the Derella Downs and Pyramid Poll sale were Pete May and Kris George, of Arkle Farms, at Bedford Harbour. Credit: Countryman

First-time buyer Pete May, who was recently appointed as farm manager at Arkle Farms, in Munglinup, secured 11 rams to a top price of $2100 and average price of $1200.

Arkle runs 10,000 Merinos, including a crossbred program.

Williams woolgrower Stephen Schulz, with his daughter Amy and son Lewis.
Camera IconWilliams woolgrower Stephen Schulz, with his daughter Amy and son Lewis. Credit: Countryman
Enjoying the Derella Downs and Pyramid Poll ram sale was Bryce Hayes-Thompson, of Bruce Rock, Rabobank Esperance area manager Ryan Meldrum, Dean Wormald, of Munglinup, Nate Sanderons, of Grass Patch, and Jonny Thomas, of Grass Patch.
Camera IconEnjoying the Derella Downs and Pyramid Poll ram sale was Bryce Hayes-Thompson, of Bruce Rock, Rabobank Esperance area manager Ryan Meldrum, Dean Wormald, of Munglinup, Nate Sanderons, of Grass Patch, and Jonny Thomas, of Grass Patch. Credit: Countryman

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