Reconciliation celebration marked on a smaller scale

Ailish DelaneyBunbury Herald
Max Jetta, of Eaton, Bunbury Elder Melba Wallam and Yaka Danjoo Events chair Karen Jetta held a small bridge walk for Sorry Day last week.
Camera IconMax Jetta, of Eaton, Bunbury Elder Melba Wallam and Yaka Danjoo Events chair Karen Jetta held a small bridge walk for Sorry Day last week. Credit: Supplied

Tomorrow brings National Reconciliation Week to a close for 2020.

This year’s theme, In This Together, draws attention to the role each Australian has to play when it comes to reconciliation.

This year marks 20 years since the reconciliation walks of 2000, when people united to walk on bridges and roads nationwide.

COVID-19 restrictions meant the community bridge walk could not take place, but smaller groups showed their respect for the traditional owners and custodians of the land with smaller group walks.

Families, South West District police, Bunbury Regional Art Gallery staff and South West Aboriginal Medical Service staff all participated in small bridge walks to acknowledge Sorry Day and the start of Reconciliation Week.

Whilst COVID-19 has prevented us from being part of a whole - community walk event this year, it is definitely not lost on us that we are all in this together.

South West District Police

WA Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt encouraged West Australians to listen to the voices of Aboriginal elders, leaders, youth and communities as they shared their stories, perspectives and discussed opportunities for reconciliation.

“The Aboriginal story is integral to the Australian story,” Mr Wyatt said.

“Through taking the time during National Reconciliation week to learn and share online, we can inform ourselves on how best to act to advance our reconciliation journey and build a better WA,” Premier Mark McGowan said. commemorate

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