Noongar culture a welcome new sight

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Briana FioreHarvey-Waroona Reporter
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Artist Cassie Jetta, elder Dennis Jetta and artist Nicole Mickle have designed and created the new entry statement artwork in Australind.
Camera IconArtist Cassie Jetta, elder Dennis Jetta and artist Nicole Mickle have designed and created the new entry statement artwork in Australind. Credit: Briana Fiore/Briana Fiore

If you’re driving through the Shire of Harvey, be sure to keep your eyes peeled for six new entry statement signs. However, the signs are not just your average run-of-the-mill street signs.

These original new emblems are rich in both culture and colour and were designed by Leschenault artists Alex and Nicole Mickle. Bunbury artist Cassie Jetta designed the indigenous components and respected elder and pastor Dennis Jetta was consulted on the use of the Noongar language.

They encompass the history of the Australind area and recognise indigenous people as the traditional land owners, all while celebrating and welcoming the multicultural community that lives in the South West today. Mrs Mickle said she was proud to incorporate many layers of history and nature into the design.

“It tells a story of our history, from our Noongar people right through to the colonial period and present day,” Mrs Mickle said.

Miss Jetta said it was important to see the Noongar references reflected in the signs. She said the circular design represented the seasons while the semi-circles recognised people sitting at a campfire and all people who sat there to this day.

Miss Jetta believed the signs rang true to the “Always was, Always will be” indigenous motto, which will also be this year’s NAIDOC Week theme.

Harvey shire president Paul Gillett said the signage linked to another art piece to be installed at the Ridley Place foreshore.

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