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Sid the Seagull spruiks slip, slop, slap slogan

Jacinta CantatoreHarvey-Waroona Reporter

Sid the Seagull flew down from Perth last week to teach South West students some lessons about being SunSmart.

With help from Cancer Council regional education officer Shenae Norris, Sid visited Picton, Brunswick Junction and Clifton Park primary schools to teach the five ways people can protect themselves when the UV was three or above – Slip, Slop, Slap, Seek and Slide.

“The five ways are so important, because sunscreen isn’t a suit of armour,” Miss Norris said.

“Using one form of protection alone isn’t enough.”

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Sid the Seagull with Brunswick primary students Connor Obel, 11, Mason Wallis, 6, Amity Bremmell, 11, Jimmy Johnson, 8, Gregory Williams, 4, Tana Brewer, 6 and Raymond Bennell with Cancer Council regional education officer Shenae Norris.
Camera IconSid the Seagull with Brunswick primary students Connor Obel, 11, Mason Wallis, 6, Amity Bremmell, 11, Jimmy Johnson, 8, Gregory Williams, 4, Tana Brewer, 6 and Raymond Bennell with Cancer Council regional education officer Shenae Norris. Credit: Jacinta Cantatore / Harvey Reporter

This is the 20th anniversary of the Cancer Council’s SunSmart program, which began as the simple Slip Slop Slap which has already had an effect on skin cancer statistics.

“We are seeing a real decrease in the skin cancer rates for the 15 to 39 age bracket,” Miss Norris said.

She said now the first SunSmart generations were becoming parents, they needed to continue these important lessons at home.

Sid the Seagull and Shenae Norris show the students the five ways to be sunsmart.
Camera IconSid the Seagull and Shenae Norris show the students the five ways to be sunsmart. Credit: Jacinta Cantatore / Harvey Reporter

“We know parents cover their children up, but we’d love to see parents role modelling SunSmart behaviour too,” Miss Norris said.

“If kids see their parents doing it, they’re more likely to be SunSmart.”

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