Awarding 37 years of volunteering

Nicolette BarbasHarvey-Waroona Reporter
Justice of the Peace Colin Beauchamp will be recieving a certificate of recognition at the Volunteer Service Awards on Wednesday night.
Camera IconJustice of the Peace Colin Beauchamp will be recieving a certificate of recognition at the Volunteer Service Awards on Wednesday night. Credit: Nicolette Barbas

As part of National Volunteer Week, Harvey’s Colin Beauchamp will be among the select few volunteers set to receive an award at the Volunteer Service Awards tomorrow in Perth.

The Volunteer Service Award Program, run by the Department of Communities, helps to acknowledge the significant efforts of longstanding West Australian volunteers for their generous contribution to the WA community.

Mr Beauchamp was appointed as a Justice of the Peace in April, 1982 and has since been making outstanding contributions to the community.

“It all began back in the 80s when I was heavily involved with the Lions club and one of my close friends was working as a Justice of the Peace at the time and suggested I get involved,” Mr Beauchamp said.

“From there I became a councillor, attended a conference as an adviser in New Zealand during the preparation of their Justices Act, presided in courts at Fremantle, Perth and Joondalup and attended many signing centres around Perth.”

Having been a visiting and bail justice at various prisons as well as working with drug disposal units, Mr Beauchamp said his most challenging role was dealing with different types of personalities.

“Doing what I did there was always some degree of difficulty, but I was able to separate my work life from my personal life and I think I have done pretty well overall,” he said.

“The praise you get from helping people is why I love what I do.”

Now set to receive yet another award for his exceptional work, the volunteer said receiving this amount of credit still came as a shock to him.

“I am always very surprised when it comes to getting awards, they seem to come out of the blue,” he said.

“I got an Australian Medal back in 2006 for the work I was doing with the cancer institute and it was amongst some of my biggest achievements and came completely out of the blue.”

At almost 90 years of age, Mr Beauchamp said he sees no signs of slowing down.

“Although I can’t do much in the way of justice now except sign documents, I will continue to work in the cancer field I am involved in because I enjoy giving back to the community.”

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